About the Books

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Synopsis

The Tree That Grew Through Iron: Book One in the Panagea Tales

She and the others were the blood of the land.
The ones who breathed oxygen into Panagea’s lungs.
But not unlike all the old-world legends, they were nowhere to be found, and faded from memory.

Centuries of industrial advancements separate mankind from their need for gods. It also eviscerates the land.

“Do not let them know. Control the chaos. Keep them safe.”
Nicholai Addihein followed this advice from Panagea’s elder division leaders since he took up control of Southeastern. But maintaining the illusion that all is well gets harder to accomplish.

Then, it happens. One decision. For Nicholai’s unexpected act of treason, Panagea decays faster. Millions are dead. The division leaders want his head. But the worst is yet to come.

After landing in the company of the fabled Captain Kazuaki Hidataka and his crew of societal rejects, Nicholai discovers her: Umbriel, the key to Panagea’s salvation. But if history rejected her for a reason before, will her return do more harm than good?


The Gods Who Harvested Men: Book Two in the Panagea Tales
They halted Panagea’s decay. Some gave everything for the good of the land. For the good of the people.
But the grass isn’t always greener on the other side of the iron fence.

The efforts of Nicholai, Umbriel, Kazuaki, and the crew welcome the purifying breath of nature back into a depleted, metal world. But it isn’t all they invite back.

The archaic gods and goddesses of Panagea’s past, forgotten long ago, when mankind realized they could answer their own prayers with machines, return.While humanity was quick to forget them, the gods never forgot the betrayal they suffered from those who created them. Those who were supposed to love them. With new changes allowing them to crawl back into the forefront of men’s thoughts, they intend to issue a painful reminder.
As Nicholai and the others scramble to contain the gods’ wrath, they learn the only advice they have is absent of any comfort.
Hold fast.
Keep your wits about you.
And most important of all… no matter what else you do… don’t pray.

Editorial Reviews

“A remarkably inventive and magical novel. McKenzie Austin strikes a beautiful balance between life and death, truth and lies, and love and loss within these pages, and while the action is riveting, the philosophical musing is similarly powerful. There are countless subtle moments of meaningful dialogue and pearls of wisdom buried in the narration. With this brilliant foundation to build upon, the next installment is a very exciting prospect for fans of genre-bending fiction.” – ★★★★½ – Self-Publishing Review
The Tree That Grew Through Iron: Book One of the Panagea Tales


Frequently Asked Questions

 

Question: What age is appropriate for this book?

Answer: I find the answer to this question is often a difficult one to nail down. Instead of giving a specific age range, I’ll say what can be encountered upon reading it:

Book one (The Tree That Grew Through Iron) does have some violent battle scenes, including, but not limited to, description evisceration, stab wounds, bullet wounds, and severing of the skull from the spinal cord.

There is some cursing (your occasional “shit” and “damn”. The ‘f’ word has been replaced with a similar counterpart. When characters feel compelled to use that word, they say ‘feck’ instead.

Sexual content includes kissing and a scene where a character is naked (but not having sex). Merely sun-bathing.

There are some heavier philosophical musings that a younger audience may not grasp, but that’s individual to the reader.

While book one is as it is, book two in the series (The Gods Who Harvested Men) does get a little more explicit.

The battle scenes are as equally descriptive as book one.
The cursing is the same level as book one.
There is more kissing and implied sex scenes in book two (nothing more descriptive than groping… more of a “fade to black” kind of deal.)
There is also the introduction of a male character’s relationship with another male. Nothing explicit that you wouldn’t also find in the male/female couple relationships touched on in the series, but given some peoples’ touchiness on the subject, it seemed worth mentioning.

Book three is currently in the works, and will likely be similar in content to its predecessors.

 

If you have any other questions you’d like to ask or have me add to the FAQ, please don’t hesitate to ask. Thank you!